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Video: Obama looks to re-energize youth vote

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    ANN CURRY, anchor: President Obama is on the road, hoping to get out the youth vote in the midterm elections that are five weeks from today. NBC 's White House correspondent, Savannah Guthrie , now joins us with more on this. Savannah , good morning.

    SAVANNAH GUTHRIE reporting: Good morning to you, Ann. Well, this is an effort to get out the so-called Obama surge voters. Those are the voters that voted for the first time in 2008 for the president. A lot of them are young, so we're going to see the president today on the campus of the University of Wisconsin at Madison . There will be 100 companion watch parties around the country, really drawing a page from the old '08 playbook. Analysts say if the president, Democrats can turn out some of these voters, it might make a difference in some of these key races. They're really trying to generate enthusiasm. In a new interview, the president says it would be inexcusable for Democrats to stay on the sidelines this election.

    CURRY: Meantime, Savannah , there is some news about the president's chief of staff, important news.

    GUTHRIE: Indeed. Rahm Emanuel widely expected to run for office in Chicago , run for mayor. It looks like that will happen, and we could get an announcement as early as Friday. The issue, of course, is who would replace him. Would it be an interim chief of staff, or will the president go ahead and name a permanent replacement? So definitely something to watch this week.

    CURRY: All right, Savannah Guthrie this morning. Savannah , thanks.

msnbc.com staff and news service reports
updated 9/28/2010 8:09:20 AM ET 2010-09-28T12:09:20

Admonishing his own party, President Barack Obama says it would be "inexcusable" and "irresponsible" for unenthusiastic Democratic voters to sit out the midterm elections, warning that the consequences could be a squandered agenda for years.

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"People need to shake off this lethargy. People need to buck up," Obama told Rolling Stone in an interview to be published Friday. The president told Democrats that making change happen is hard and "if people now want to take their ball and go home, that tells me folks weren't serious in the first place."

The midterm elections are in five weeks and polling shows that Republicans, out of power at the White House and on Capitol Hill, have a much more excited base of supporters than Democrats. Obama, campaigning this week in four states, is in a sprint to restore the voter passion that helped him win office.

Yet in his attempt to light a fire under supporters, Obama comes across as fired up himself about how many backers fail to acknowledge the progress he sees. He said the glass-half-empty view among many progressive voters can be a debilitating force that distracts them from the real worry: Republicans.

The GOP is poised to win seats in the House, if not control of the chamber, and gain ground in the Senate, too.

"It is inexcusable for any Democrat or progressive right now to stand on the sidelines in this midterm election," Obama said.

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Separately on Monday, Vice President Joe Biden told Democrats

at a fund-raising event in New Hampshire

that they should "stop whining."

Biden spoke about the economy to about a dozen voters at a home in Manchester, where he was joined by New Hampshire's three Democrats in Congress: Hodes, Shea-Porter and Sen. Jeanne Shaheen.

Biden said Democrats will lose if the November election is a referendum on how people feel about the economy, but they'll win if they emphasize the progress they've made and plans to build on it. He said he understands that someone looking for a job doesn't have time to track the details of the new health care law or stimulus program, but he said Democrats should remind those voters that many of the benefits haven't kicked in yet.

The vice president expanded on his "whining" remarks during an interview on MSNBC's "The Last Word" with Lawrence O'Donnell.

Video: Video: Biden on "The Last Word"

"Those who ... didn't get everything they wanted, it's time to just buck up here, understand that we can make things better ... but not yield the playing field to those folks who are against everything we stand for."

The president, for his part, has been telling Democrats to "wake up" and recognize that he and the Democratic-run Congress have delivered on promises, from a new health care law to tougher rules for Wall Street to more aid for college students. Obama wants disenchanted supporters to see that Republican wins in November would undermine the ability of Democrats to get the unfinished business done, from climate change legislation to allowing gays to serve openly in the military.

Stern lecture from Obama
What emerges in the magazine story is a stern, lecturing tone from Obama.

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It comes mainly at the end of the interview. Obama had wrapped the lengthy Q-and-A session, according to the magazine, but then returned unprompted to make one more impassioned point and unleash on the enthusiasm gap. He portrayed a clear choice between an administration that despite some warts has helped advance its agenda, and a Republican Party that would offer disastrous policies for the economy and civil liberties.

"The idea that we've got a lack of enthusiasm in the Democratic base, that people are sitting on their hands complaining, is just irresponsible," he said in the interview. He said Democrats should be thinking about what's at stake this election "if they want to move forward over the next two years or six years or 10 years."

The Rolling Stone interview was conducted Sept. 17. The Associated Press obtained a copy of the story, titled "Obama Fights Back."

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Obama expresses plenty of disappointment over how Republicans made a tactical decision from the start to oppose him, but also offers some "grudging admiration" for its political effectiveness in keeping the GOP united. He said the resulting slog between Republicans and himself — legislative delays and political fighting reminiscent of the Washington he ran against — has worsened public skepticism of government and eroded the feeling of hope that surrounded his election.

The president said he keeps a checklist of his campaign promises and that he has met, by his account, about 70 percent of them.

As for the rest: "Well, that's what the next two years is for, or maybe the next six."

Obama would need to win re-election in 2012 for that latter timeframe to occur.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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