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Video: Apples: Savory style

  1. Transcript of: Apples: Savory style

    MATT LAUER, co-host: This morning on TODAY'S KITCHEN , BACK TO BASICS , a fall favorite, apples . One of our favorite chefs, Jose Andres , is here to put a savory spin on these apples . He's the Chef of Minibar in Washington , DC , and by the way, will be teaching part of a science and cooking class at Harvard University this fall. Professor, good morning. Nice to see you.

    Mr. JOSE ANDRES (Chef, Minibar): No professor here.

    LAUER: Nice to see you.

    Mr. ANDRES: I cook.

    LAUER: That's impressive. Good to see you. We're going to do some apple dishes here. When you're eating an apple vs. cooking an apple , do you like a different variety?

    Mr. ANDRES: Well, I have many. The ones that my daughters love are the ones I love. They love Galas , the love Mackintosh , like these ones.

    LAUER: Right.

    Mr. ANDRES: they love the Granny Smith , these ones here.

    LAUER: But do they all cook well or are some better than others?

    Mr. ANDRES: All cook.

    LAUER: Right.

    Mr. ANDRES: What happens some, when they are very sour and they have a lot of acidity and they are hard, they're going to be very firm, even if you cook them for a long time. When they are sweeter, they have more sugar, the apples they are always going to break.

    LAUER: They're going to decompose a little bit.

    Mr. ANDRES: So you're the ones that -- you're the ones that choose which one you want.

    LAUER: OK. We're making stuffed apples , stuffed baked apples . We're going to put meat -- and it's a savory recipe. We start with bread, though, right?

    Mr. ANDRES: We start with bread. So here we have all bread crumbs . You don't want to throw them in garbage. You get the bread, you put some milk, you mix them until you see that the bread is really becoming kind

    of....

    LAUER: Right.

    Mr. ANDRES: Once this happens, you put it right here with the meat.

    LAUER: OK. So is this ground beef ?

    Mr. ANDRES: Ground beef , ground chicken, ground turkey. Use your favorite ground meet. In this case, we have some beef and some pork.

    LAUER: OK. What do you add to that?

    Mr. ANDRES: So we put some parley, we put some onions, we put some garlic, we put some cinnamon, some salt. You mix that whole thing very well.

    LAUER: OK. Yeah.

    Mr. ANDRES: Very well. And now you start coring the apples .

    LAUER: OK. You don't core it all the way through because you don't want it to come apart at the bottom, right?

    Mr. ANDRES: You are right, but they did this one wrong. This one has a big hole .

    LAUER: OK. That's what I said, you don't core the whole apple .

    Mr. ANDRES: You know your recipe. So you make like, you know, you can do this with a baller.

    LAUER: Right.

    Mr. ANDRES: You make a hole in the top, you make sure that -- I just broke the baller, great. It likes to be. You make a big hole . You see, you have enough space to fill the apples .

    LAUER: OK. And you don't peel these apples . You use the peel and all, right?

    Mr. ANDRES: You don't peel it. Why? Because the peel is going to protect the apple from becoming dry.

    LAUER: OK.

    Mr. ANDRES: So leave the peel on. It's easier.

    LAUER: Right.

    Mr. ANDRES: You see, you stuff them. You can do this with your kids. You put them in the tray, some sherry, some olive oil .

    LAUER: Don't you also put a little lemon on the outside of them? Is that so they don't brown?

    Mr. ANDRES: Yeah. OK. But what happens is I'm so quick, so quick, that they don't even have time to brown. But the recipe also will tell you put some lemon...

    LAUER: I was going to say, are you doing a different recipe than I read here?

    Mr. ANDRES: ...put some lemon so the apples will not become brown.

    LAUER: OK, OK, thank you. Sorry about that.

    Mr. ANDRES: Man, two pieces in the recipe wrong.

    LAUER: You pop those in the oven, right?

    Mr. ANDRES: In the oven.

    LAUER: Let's come on back here.

    Mr. ANDRES: For how long? Well, for as long as you think the apples are ready. It's going to take you 30, 40 minutes, 350 degrees. Take a look how beautiful they look.

    LAUER: If you want -- you want the meat to be brown, you want the apple to be kind of soft and easy to carve.

    Mr. ANDRES: Soft, like this one. The meet is going to be perfectly cooked.

    LAUER: How do you garnish this?

    Mr. ANDRES: This is how you'd like a meat loaf in an apple .

    LAUER: How do you garnish this?

    Mr. ANDRES: Some thyme. You put it right on top, nice, fresh thyme or rosemary, and you have a dish that is going to surprise everyone.

    LAUER: It looks great. OK. The next one is what?

    Mr. ANDRES: My favorite dish, very traditional in Catalonia . It's spinach with apples , rice and some pine nuts . And guess what, I put these apples right before we begin. And now they are beautiful and brown.

    LAUER: Right.

    Mr. ANDRES: You see the smell . These ones are...

    LAUER: You see the smell ? Is that what you just said to me?

    Mr. ANDRES: You...

    LAUER: Smell the smell .

    Mr. ANDRES: But why you cannot see the smell ? If the smell is good, you're going to be able to see it.

    LAUER: OK.

    Mr. ANDRES: You see that this is smelling good.

    LAUER: All right.

    Mr. ANDRES: People are going to know the smell at home. So I'm smelling a delicious sweet flavor. Are you with me ?

    LAUER: Harvard is never going to be the same, I can tell you that.

    Mr. ANDRES: Yeah. So take a look. You put some pine nuts ...

    LAUER: Right.

    Mr. ANDRES: ...you put some raisins. I mean, can you do something, Matt ?

    LAUER: Yeah, here you go.

    Mr. ANDRES: Basically, I'm doing all the work. Great. And then you add the spinach.

    ANN CURRY, co-host: I want to see the smell !

    Mr. ANDRES: You saw that. Wow.

    CURRY: Where is the smell ? Oh, I see it!

    Mr. ANDRES: People of America , they're making fun of my English! That don't understand the diversity of my English.

    CURRY: No, we love you.

    AL ROKER reporting: Actually, we love your English.

    CURRY: No, but you're so not effusive. It's such a problem.

    Mr. ANDRES: You mix and here you have your beautiful Catalan spinach.

    CURRY: Oh, I'm having this now.

    TAMRON HALL, anchor: Um!

    LAUER: And that's going to wilt down a little bit.

    CURRY: Oh!

    LAUER: But just tell us quickly what's that dish on the end?

    Mr. ANDRES: Some apples ......sliced, a great olive oil from Spain .

    ROKER: Espana .

    Mr. ANDRES: Cherry vinegar, blue cheese. You put some almonds on top and you have an unbelievable simple apple salad.

    CURRY: Not just an OK simple apple salad, unbelievable!

    HALL: It's unbelievable.

    Mr. ANDRES: Unbelievable.

    ROKER: Unbelievable.

    LAUER: Professor Jose Andres .

TODAY recipes
updated 9/17/2010 5:45:28 PM ET 2010-09-17T21:45:28

Recipe: Savory stuffed baked apples

Ingredients
  • For the filling
  • 3 slices bread, crust removed and torn into small pieces
  • 3/4 cup milk
  • 1 pound ground pork, beef or veal, or a combination
  • 2 slices bacon, minced
  • 1 small onion, minced
  • 1 clove garlic, peeled and minced
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • Chopped parsley
  • Salt to taste
  • Stuffed apples
  • 6 large baking apples, like McIntosh or Empire, cored
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • Meat filling
  • Olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon oloroso sherry
  • Salt
Preparation

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Using a paring knife, expand the opening in each apple. Rub cored apples with lemon juice to keep from browning. Soak the bread in milk until well saturated, about 10 minutes. Combine the soaked bread with the meat, onion, parsley, cinnamon and salt. Generously stuff each apple with the meat mixture. Drizzle with a little bit of olive oil and oloroso sherry. Sprinkle with salt. Bake for 35 minutes in an oven-safe baking dish.

Serving Size

Serves 6

Discuss:

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