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See inside! Stunning 89-year-old Tudor-style home hits the market

When cotton gin magnate Robert Munger set out to build an upscale neighborhood in Dallas in the early 1900s, he was particular. Homes had to cost at least $10,000 to build, be made of brick or masonry and stand at least two stories high.

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Famous architects rushed in to build homes in an eclectic mix of styles, including this Tudor manor at the crown of Swiss Avenue, which was one of Dallas' first paved streets.

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Fittingly, a paving tycoon built this 6,300-square-foot historic mansion that's now on the market for $1.245 million.

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Tudor homes "have a grandness to them," said listing agent Elizabeth Mast of Briggs Freeman/Sotheby's International Realty. "I think it's because you've got a lot of peaks, and on this house in particular, the incredible chimneys."

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The sprawling home is indeed replete with steeply pitched roofs, front-facing gables and spectacular chimneys for its three fireplaces. It has five bedrooms, four baths and three carriage houses out back, each measuring 1,200 square feet.

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The paving fellow, Robert Stubbs, died shortly after the home was completed in 1926, but his wife, Marie, lived there until 1940. After that, it rotated through numerous owners and became a rooming house. A doctor bought the place in 1974 and returned it to a single-family home with a state-of-the-art kitchen and a swimming pool.

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The home's most recent owner was Willetta Stellmacher, a former chorus girl and vaudevillian who became known as a "pistol-packin' mama" for fiercely protecting her rental properties.

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Several original elements remain, including windows etched with wisteria that reach the height of the staircase and special tile floors in sun rooms on either side of the home.

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The living areas boast carved and hand-painted strapwork on their 12-foot ceilings, mahogany paneling and pocket doors. A catastrophic hailstorm a few years ago destroyed the historic roofs of numerous homes, and this one — made from a green Ludowici tile that was available only from a single factory in Ohio — cost $650,000 to replace, Mast said.

Jason Anderson / Courtesy of Zillow

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