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The 1 home trend the 'Property Brothers' are against — and for good reason

Looks like Drew and Jonathan Scott aren’t big fans of tiny houses. In fact the "Property Brothers" recently told PopSugar that they want the whole trend to just go away.

“I don't like it because most of the tiny houses we've seen, they're not built to code,” Jonathan said. “They're not actually functional.”

Getty Images for HGTV

One of the things that make tiny houses appealing to homeowners is the idea of living simply. Although, Jonathan added that he doesn’t think these structures are actually designed well enough to achieve that. “I've only ever seen a couple tiny home spaces that are actually a clever use of space,” he said.

As anyone knows, you’re not supposed to knock it until you try it, so the brothers actually stayed in one to get the feel of it. Unfortunately, it was as chaotic an experience as they expected. They were accompanied by Jonathan’s two small dogs and couldn’t quite fall in love with the lifestyle.

RELATED: There's a third 'Property Brother'! Here are 8 things to know about J.D. Scott

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'Property Brothers' Drew and Jonathan Scott create a dream backyard

Play Video - 3:32

'Property Brothers' Drew and Jonathan Scott create a dream backyard

Play Video - 3:32

The whole hilarious 24 hours is documented by HGTV. And while they didn’t like the cramped quarters, they did appreciate one good thing about the tiny space: not having to clean as much.

RELATED: Drew Scott spills engagement details on TODAY: He proposed with cake!

But that doesn’t seem to be enough to win their hearts. "Our whole philosophy is that your home should make your life easier, and as soon as you start tripping over each other and trying to squeeze too much into a space for it to work, then you're not making your life easier,” Drew said. “You're making your life more hectic."

  • Slideshow Photos

    Steve Niedorf

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    Obsessed with tiny homes? We are, too. See inside some of our favorites from across the country.

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    If Joanna Gaines designed a tiny home, this 290-square-foot home from Handcrafted Movement would be it. 

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    The home features a cozy electric fireplace, a farmhouse-style sink and an Edison Bulb chandelier that gives it a chic but homey vibe.

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    Home sweet home. 

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    LED lighting brightens up the bathroom which features a five-foot long freestanding tub with rain shower-head.

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    Upstairs in the loft bedroom, a storage shelf, baskets and hanging rod make space for clothes and other items.

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    This 400-square-foot charmer is a slice of heaven.

    Stephanie Butchin/Broken Glass Images Real Estate Photography
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    "It's very open, very airy and very much a sanctuary," the owner said. "You can live there year-round and feel like you're cuddled in the space."

    Stephanie Butchin/Broken Glass Images Real Estate Photography
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    With vaulted ceilings and hardwood floors, the home offers a spacious living room that flows past an eat-in bar to the kitchen, all with stylishly exposed beams and large skylights. 

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    The bedroom offers a double closet, a ceiling fan for staying cool in the summer and a door to the backyard.

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    When designer and architect Christi Azevedo came across a place with a former French laundry for sale in San Francisco, she had the perfect idea for the 88-square-foot boiler room: to transform it into a full-service guest apartment.

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    “The entire place was a wreck, but there were loads of details remaining,” she said. The space, which she lovingly calls the “Brick House,” was given an efficient and modern upgrade.

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    It now hosts a new IKEA kitchen, complete with a stainless steel countertop and custom upper doors of sanded acrylic.

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    The bed loft, complete with a queen mattress and plenty of storage, is located by way of a glass landing.

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    A 42-inch bath features a wall-mount toilet, a custom stainless steel medicine cabinet, small sink and floor drain shower.

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    It may be tiny, but the new 160-square-foot home feels much bigger thanks to its long panoramic windows that draw the outdoors in.

    Steve Niedorf / Courtesy of Escape Vista
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    The living space is small but efficient. There’s a double-sized daybed (queen-bed optional), extensive storage and LED lighting.

    Steve Niedorf / Courtesy of Escape Vista
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    Maple cabinetry fills the kitchen, along with a stainless sink, small dining/work table, undercounter refrigerator/freezer and solid butcher block tops. Vacation in the mountains, anyone?

    Steve Niedorf / Courtesy of Escape Vista
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