Health & Wellness

Serena Williams' fans speak out against Photoshopped Instagram (which was quickly replaced)

Although being named one of People magazine's most beautiful women in the world should be a moment of celebration for tennis star Serena Williams, it upset some fans who noticed a version of the photo shoot Williams posted on Instagram was likely altered.

The 34-year-old shared a sneak peek of her appearance in the May 2 issue, writing "People mag most beautiful 2016" accompanied by a fist-pump emoji.

@people mag most beautiful 2016 ✊🏿

A post shared by Serena Williams (@serenawilliams) on

The photo has since garnered nearly 42,000 likes and hundreds of comments, most of which address the rumors that some editing had been done.

"Your waist is already tiny, I'm not sure why they felt the need to Photoshop, you're still a goddess either way," one user commented.

But it was the original photo Williams posted that caused the uproar. Fans immediately recognized that her body had been Photoshopped, and she quickly replaced it with what appears to be the non-edited version.

RELATED: Blogger smashes the 'perfect body' myth with live-Photoshopping video

This isn't the first time that a star has been in the limelight for questions surrounding Photoshopped images.

So...You know me. I'm not one to be quiet about a magazine cover. I always celebrate it when a respected publication invites me to grace their pages. It's an honor. And a privilege. And ADWEEK is no exception. I love ADWEEK. It's a publication I appreciate. And learn from. I've long followed them on Twitter. And when they invited me to do a cover, I was excited and thrilled. And the truth is, I'm still excited. I'm proud of the article. And I like some of the inside images a great deal. But, I have to be honest...I was taken aback by the cover. Look, I'm no stranger to Photoshopping. It happens a lot. In a way, we have become a society of picture adjusters - who doesn't love a filter?!? And I don't always take these adjustments to task but I have had the opportunity to address the impact of my altered image in the past and I think it's a valuable conversation. Yesterday, however, I just felt weary. It felt strange to look at a picture of myself that is so different from what I look like when I look in the mirror. It's an unfortunate feeling. That being said. You all have been very kind and supportive. Also, as I've said, I'm very proud of the article. There are a few things we discussed in the interview that were left out. Things that are important to me (like: the importance of strong professional support and my awesome professional team) and I've been thinking about how to discuss those things with anyone who is interested, in an alternate forum. But until then...Grab this week's ADWEEK. Read it. I hope you enjoy it. And thank you for being patient with me while I figured out how to post this in a way that felt both celebratory and honest. XOXOXOX

A post shared by Kerry Washington (@kerrywashington) on

Three weeks ago, Kerry Washington spoke out about falling victim to the editing software, telling Matt Lauer in an interview on TODAY: "My big complaint was that it felt altered — in general. It wasn't that there was something specific. It was the feeling of looking at something and knowing that it had been altered."

She had also spoken out on Instagram, writing: "I just felt weary. It felt strange to look at a picture of myself that is so different from what I look like when I look in the mirror. It's an unfortunate feeling."

RELATED: Ronda Rousey slams Photoshop sneak attack: It 'goes against everything I believe'

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