Health & Wellness

Ryan Reynolds writes touching tribute to 'Deadpool' fan, 13, who died of cancer

When the world's biggest "Deadpool'' fan died from cancer after a three-year battle this week, Ryan Reynolds lost a close friend.

Reynolds paid tribute to fellow Canadian Connor McGrath, 13, with a touching Facebook post about their friendship and the "smart" and "funny" teenager, whom Reynolds met through the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

"Connor was a great friend, a great son, and a light to the people lucky enough to know him,'' Reynolds wrote. "I'm grateful I got to orbit Connor's world for a brief time. Grateful for the pages and pages of hilarious texts between us. Grateful to his parents for allowing Connor to spend time with a foul-mouthed child in the body of a 39-year-old."

RELATED: Ryan Reynolds reveals sweet reason he and Blake Lively named daughter James

The boy from Newfoundland was the first person to ever see the blockbuster "Deadpool" movie. Working with the Make-A-Wish Foundation, Reynolds visited him at Stollery Children's Hospital in Edmonton, Canada, and showed him a rough cut of the film long before it was released in theaters.

Closed Captioning
apply | reset x
font
size
T
T
T
T
color

Ryan Reynolds talks ‘Deadpool,’ plays spin the bottle with fan

Play Video - 4:46

Ryan Reynolds talks ‘Deadpool,’ plays spin the bottle with fan

Play Video - 4:46

More video

"Before you jump down my throat for showing a 13 year old an R-Rated film, please know this kid knew more swear words than a British chef,'' Reynolds joked in his tribute.

McGrath was a huge "Deadpool" fan, and Reynolds viewed him as a superhero of his own. He also thanked the Make-A-Wish Foundation for bringing them together.

RELATED: Ryan Reynolds reveals fatherhood 'strong suit': 'I always do the dirty work'

"We met because he loved Deadpool,'' Reynolds wrote. "In a certain sense he WAS Deadpool. Or, at least everything Deadpool aspires to be; balancing pain, fearlessness, love and a filthy (filthy!) sense of humor in one body. I wish he could've stuck around a lot longer."

Follow TODAY.com writer Scott Stump on Twitter.

TOP