The 60 best places to eat in the US

Looking for more than just a good meal and hoping that your restaurant of choice has that je ne sais quoi? When it comes to dining while on vacation, sometimes the quality of food isn't enough — it's also about the overall experience. After all, you have limited time to create those special memories at your destination of choice.

Luckily, Condé Nast Traveler did the work for you in its fall issue. Together with restaurateurs, chefs and travel and food editors, CNT's team sought out the ultimate go-to places next time you find yourself in a new town without a Yelp review handy.

Conde Nast Traveler revealed its picks for the best places to eat around the world.

These restaurants made the national cut for their "Where in the World to Eat" roundup, recognizing and celebrating exceptional dining experiences, both big and small, around the U.S. Bon appétit!

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The Best Restaurants in the U.S.


West coast, best coast? Next time you're in the Golden State, look to one of these hot spots to satisfy your taste buds.


This spot in the Sunshine State offers up New American fare complete with an open kitchen and personal garden to add that special touch to your experience.


Ain't nothing but peachy reviews for these two Georgia staples.

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CEO of Tastemakers Africa Cherae Robinson told CNT that Two Urban Licks is "the restaurant that kicked off the New American trend in Atlanta. My favorites include the salmon chips, topped with fresh smoked salmon, capers, red onions, and a dab of chipotle cream cheese; the brisket-filled empanadas; the scallops and grits; and the rotisserie chicken with mac ’n’ cheese."

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You might be surprised to find innovative New American and Italian cuisine in the heart of Honolulu, but Town is a local favorite.


The Windy City offers up some of the country's finest dining at these three higher-end destinations, whether you're in the mood for burgers or lobster.

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Sean Brock, chef and co-owner of Husk and McCrady's in Charleston, has a sure-fire way to get a seat at Next, Chicago's stylish high-end destination for themed tasting menus and eclectic fare. "Because the concept and menu changes several times a year, this is definitely one to visit over and over. Use their ticketing system, Tock, to secure a reservation. And follow them on social media, because if there ever are last-minute cancellations, they offer them up to their followers," he told CNT.


Brunch is more than a meal, it's a lifestyle. And this cutting-edge cafe-diner gets it right with some of the most unconventional breakfast dishes out there.

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New Orleans may just be the most charming city in the world, and these two go-to places show off the Big Easy's culinary variety. Head to Brennan's for some old-school homegrown cuisine if you want to experience 1940s New Orleans, or to Shaya for a more modern take on Israeli fare.


When you're not busy chowing down and clam chowder, look no further than these three cozy corners, located on the outskirts of Boston and the picturesque coast of New England.


In the mood for some New American fare that feels like a warm, home-cooked meal, complete with a a perfect peach pie to top it off? You can find that at this old factory that's been turned into a rustic restaurant.


CNT correspondent and travel and food writer Peter Jon Lindberg calls Portland's specialty oyster bar with a quaint small-town feel "the oyster bar of your dreams."

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"The oyster bar of your dreams: briny half-shells most likely harvested that morning, note-perfect lobster rolls, a killer wine list, and all sorts of unexpected treats on the daily menu," Peter Jon Lindberg told CNT.


Don't let the bright lights of the famous Vegas strip blind you. Sin City has a Japanese spot that Peter Jon Lindberg calls "fantastically authentic," and serves as a reminder that Vegas has "a genuine homegrown food scene — one more global and diverse than almost any other U.S. city."

(Fun fact: "Raku" means "enjoyment," "comfort" or "ease" in Japanese.)

New York

There's more to the Big Apple than pizza, pretzels, hot dogs and the Halal Guys (though all of those options are still pretty spectacular).

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Portland is known to have some of the world's best street food, so it's only fitting that this little Thai gem has two food cart locations on opposite sides of the city. (Voodoo Doughnut is even in walking distance from one of them!)


When you need a break from all of the rich American history that the City of Brotherly Love has to offer, check out this modern Israeli spot for some tasty and authentic cuisine.

South Carolina

Don't let the name fool you. This no-frills seafood joint on the water of Mount Pleasant captures South Carolina's quintessential southern charm and is loved by the locals.


Take a venture outside of Nashville to experience what Top Chef judge Gail Simmons calls "Southern hospitality at its finest."

“There is nothing in America quite like this magical destination nestled deep in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains — both as a luxury inn and a food-lover’s paradise," she told CNT.

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The tasting menu changes almost daily to showcase produce, meat, and handmade cheeses from the surrounding area, a good portion of which is grown or raised on-site," food writer and Top Chef judge Gail Simmons told CNT. "The Barn reserves a limited number of tables per night for guests who are not staying on-property, so book as far in advance as possible. Or better yet, book a weekend getaway so you can fly-fish, hike, horseback-ride, or romp in the woods with their cuddly pack of truffle-hunting dogs to work up your appetite.”


Everything is bigger in Texas, right? Go big or go home with these extensive and unique Japanese, Vietnamese and New American menus.

  • Uchi, Austin
  • Kim Phat Hu Tieu Nam Vang, Houston
  • Oxheart, Houston


It's easy to overlook a food chain, but Peter Chang's authentic Chinese cuisine that boasts "bold taste and fully-flavored dishes," has earned accolades from The New York Times, and Travel + Leisure to name a few.

  • Peter Chang, Short Pump


Known for its abundance of striking forests, Vermont's Hen of the Wood stays true to the natural beauty of its state, offering local and seasonal fare that keeps "strong ties to farmers and foragers," according to chef Ford Fry.

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“I love this restaurant for chef Eric Warnstedt's thoughtfulness toward ingredients and seasons, and his strong ties to farmers and foragers. He serves up food that is straightforward and delicious. My favorites are the house charcuterie plates, the braised pork, and the perfect steak with awesome smoky potatoes,” Chef Ford Fry told CNT.


Looking to experience the real taste of the Pacific Northwest? These two locations offer regional delights, but you can choose whether you want a more classic and striking high-end setting, or a minimalist, country-chic space.

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For the complete list of the best restaurants across the globe, visit Conde Nast Traveler's website here.

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