TV

Good guys and bad bond on 'The Killing'

June 17, 2013 at 6:43 AM ET

Image: Seward on "The Killing"
Carole Segal / AMC
Ray Seward (Peter Sarsgaard) bonded with Alton, which worked against him this week.

Three weeks into the third season of AMC’s "The Killing," the bond between Linden and Holder continues to strengthen as the two find themselves delving deeper into the mystery of Seattle’s shrinking teenage prostitute population. (Oh yeah: And the descent into darkness continues unabated, too.)

Indeed, Linden’s feelings toward Holder’s current partner, Carl Reddick, are decidedly solidified when she snaps at him, “23 years of experience, and all you are is in the way.” But given the way he immediately hops outside to join her on a trip to visit a witness, he most likely agrees.

There’s more going on in the episode than just what happening between the two mainstays of the series, however.

Impromptu press conference

One of the reasons Carl’s in such a rotten mood this week is that after he and Holder spot Goldie the Limping Pimp racing off to parts unknown with an unidentified woman in his car, they follow him. Turns out there was no crime about to be committed, only a meeting with squadron of reporters and to mouth off about his treatment by Seattle’s finest and how other suspects are being ignored as a result. It’s a police department’s worst nightmare, and boss man Skinner doesn’t hesitate to express his feelings on the matter.

Death row beat-down

The relationship between the sociopathic Ray Seward and fellow prisoner Alton is one that’s kept viewers racked with tension, wondering if Seward’s finally going to decide he’s had enough of Alton’s mouth and just kill the guy. Somewhat unexpectedly, however, Seward seems to have taken a shine to Alton, and it’s one that their guards have picked up on: When Seward won’t take his meds, they start beating Alton’s ass until, amazingly enough, Seward decides to give in to save Alton. Alton’s only semi-grateful, telling Seward he shouldn’t have let them win, causing a dejected Seward to reply, “They won a long time ago.”

Yo, Joe

Danette Lutz started out the season as the series’ least likely candidate for Mother of the Year, but she managed to win a brief moment or two of sympathy when Linden paid her a visit and played her the video of her daughter. It’s still not enough to get her to completely change her tune, but she does at least manage to provide Linden with a little bit of assistance. Unfortunately, as we discover in the closing shot of the episode, her taste in terrible men has brought her into a liaison with Joe Mills, the creepiest cab driver in Seattle. There’s no way that’s going to end well.

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